WHITE SPOTS?

The image may look like a fairly normal picture of the night sky, but what you’re looking at is a lot more special than just glittering stars. Each of those white dots is an active supermassive black hole.

Totalling 25,000 such dots, astronomers have created the most detailed map of black holes at low radio frequencies, an achievement that took years and a Europe-sized radio telescope to compile.

This image covers the ultra-low radio wavelengths, as detected by the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) in Europe.

THE HUMAN EYE HAS A RESOLUTION OF 576 MEGAPIXELS

A single megapixel is equivalent to the one million pixels is an image. You can calculate how many pixels your camera gets by multiplying the width and height of the image.

Your eyes continually flick around to cover a larger area than your field of view and the composite image is assembled in the brain.

In better height conditions, you can distinguish two fine lines if they are separated by at least 0.6 arc-minutes (0.01 degree), which is equivalent to the pixel size or 0.3 arc-minutes.

Now take the 120-degree horizontal field and 60 degree vertical plane as your total plane of view.

The resolution of your eye would be: 576-megapixels of available image data.